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Dynamic Braking

Dynamic braking is a method to slow a servo system by dissipating the mechanical energy in a resistor driven by the motor back EMF. Each axis has a built-in advanced dynamic braking mode which operates fully in hardware. When activated, the drive shorts the motor terminals for an axis in phase with the back EMF (q axis) but continues to operate the non-force producing current loop (d-axis) with 0 current. This action forces all of the dynamic braking current toward stopping the motor current and ensures the fastest stopping of motor terminal current.

The drive hardware also limits the maximum dynamic braking motor terminal current using the AXIS#.DBILIMIT parameter to prevent the drive, motor, and customer load from encountering excessive currents/forces. When the current is not being limited, the mechanical energy is dissipated in the motor terminal resistance. When the current is being limited, energy is returned to the drive bus capacitors. When the amount of returned energy raises the bus capacitor voltage enough, the drive activates the regeneration control to start transferring the returned energy to the regen resistor. This resistor could be internal or external to the drive depending on drive model and drive wiring.

Whether and how the drive uses dynamic braking mode depends on the axis disable mode (AXIS#.DISMODE) setting.

Drive Regeneration

When the servo motor is slowing down at a rate faster than friction and motor losses would slow the motor, then mechanical energy can be returned to the drive. This returned energy initially drives the internal bus voltage upwards. When the returned energy is high enough, the regeneration control transfers the excess returned energy into the regeneration power resistor. If the regeneration control cannot fully handle the power returned (for example, because there is not a regen resistor present or its resistance value is too high), then the bus voltage will continue to rise and a bus over voltage fault will happen and disable the drive completely, which allows the motor to freewheel.


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